Contemporary Movies Set in the South African (Post-)Apartheid Era

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Recently, a few films have been produced about the South African (post-)apartheid era. In this article, I will present you some of the most popular films that play during this time. This post gives you a short overview on the following movies: District 9, Invictus, The Bang Bang Club and In My Country, which are all highly recommendable and thus worth seeing.

District 9 (IMDB: 8.0) is a science fiction movie, which plays in Johannesburg, South Africa. The focus lies on a refugee camp that is inhabited by an alien population since 1982. In 2010, they should be forcibly removed. This movie highlights the clash of two different cultures (terrestrial and extraterrestrial) and how the ‘other’ is being exploited and segregated.

Invictus (IMDB: 7.3) features Morgan Freeman, Matt Damon and Tony Kgoroge. The film recounts how the newly elected president of South Africa, Nelson Mandela, tries to unite the country by bringing his people together through sport. Mandela teams up with the captain of South African’s national rugby team and tries to win the championship. The story is set in the aftermath of the Apartheid era, where the country is still economically and racially divided.

The Bang Bang Club (IMDB: 6.7) is based on a true story and revolves around four combat photographers during the last days of apartheid. It’s a moving story about brave people who risked their lives and went to the battle zone of Soweto, South Africa, simply for some pictures. Although the IMDB rating isn’t quite as high, I’d highly recommend you to watch this movie (my own rating: 8.0).

In the film In My Country (IMDB: 5.8), a Washington Post journalist is sent to South Africa to cover the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings. Through these hearings, the unspeakable truth of murder and torture during the apartheid era comes to light. How do you react as a white South African after having heard these cruelties? Who can forgive whom and is it possible to heal the wounds of the Apartheid era?

Have I missed a film? Feel free to recommend other great movies, which are set in South Africa!

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